Material property comparison

Technical Data comparison of various prototyping materials, including Mechanical, Physical, Thermal & Electrical properties compared in an interactive sliding scale.

Prototyping Material Property Comparison

Density (g/cm³)

For a homogeneous object, Density = Mass Divided By Volume. The higher the density, the tighter the particles are packed inside the substance. The Specific Gravity is the ratio of Density of the material to the Density of water at a specified temperature. It is common to use the density of water at 4°C as reference - at this point the density of water is at the highest i.e. 1 g/cm3. So Specific Gravity of less than “1” means that the material will float in water.

  • ABS
    g/cm³
  • PC
    g/cm³
  • PP
    g/cm³
  • ACETAL(POM)
    g/cm³
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
    g/cm³
  • NYLON
    g/cm³
  • HDPE
    g/cm³

Water Absorption-24 Hours (%)

Water absorption is used to determine the amount of water absorbed under specified conditions. Water absorption is expressed as increase in weight percent. Percent Water Absorption = [(Wet weight - Dry weight)/ Dry weight] x 100

  • ABS
    %
  • PC
    %
  • PP
    %
  • ACETAL(POM)
    %
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
    %
  • NYLON
    %
  • HDPE
    %

Tensile Strength (Mpa)

Tensile strength is a property of a material that measures the force required to pull something to the point where it breaks. Tensile strength is important for a material that is going to be stretched or under tension. In many brittle materials such as rock, concrete, cast iron, tensile strength is almost negligible.

  • ABS
    Mpa
  • PC
    Mpa
  • PP
    Mpa
  • ACETAL(POM)
    Mpa
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
    Mpa
  • NYLON
    Mpa
  • HDPE
    Mpa

Tensile Modulus (GPa)

Tensile Modulus, also known as Young's modulus, is defined as the ratio of stress to strain. Rigid materials, such as metals, have a high Young's modulus. In general, fibres have high Young's modulus values, elastomers have low values, and plastics lie somewhere in-between.

  • ABS
    GPa
  • PC
    GPa
  • PP
    GPa
  • ACETAL(POM)
    GPa
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
    GPa
  • NYLON
    GPa
  • HDPE
    GPa

Elongation at break (%)

The elongation at break is the strain on a sample when it breaks. This is usually expressed as a percent. The elongation at break is sometimes called the ultimate elongation. Fibres have a low elongation-to-break and elastomers have a high elongation-to-break

  • ABS
    %
  • PC
    %
  • PP
    %
  • ACETAL(POM)
    %
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
    %
  • NYLON
    %
  • HDPE
    %

Izod impact Strength Notched (J/m)

Notched Izod Impact is a test of how impact resistant a polymer will be. This is useful information when the application is for high impact performance. The Izod Impact test is a measurement from energy used to break a notch in the specimens.

  • ABS
    J/m
  • PC
    J/m
  • PP
    J/m
  • ACETAL(POM)
    J/m
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
    J/m
  • NYLON
    J/m
  • HDPE
    J/m

Flexural Strength (MPa)

The flexural strength of a material is its ability to resist deformation under load, or how much you can bend the material before it starts to break. Skis, fishing rods, pole vault poles and diving boards are examples of parts needing high flexural strength.

  • ABS
    Mpa
  • PC
    Mpa
  • PP
    Mpa
  • ACETAL(POM)
    Mpa
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
    Mpa
  • NYLON
    Mpa
  • HDPE
    Mpa

Vicat Softening Temp (℃)

The temperature at which a thermoplastic material reaches a specific level of softness. It is taken as the temperature at which the specimen is penetrated to a depth of 1 mm by a flat-ended needle with a 1 square mm circular or square cross-section.

  • ABS
  • PC
  • PP
  • ACETAL(POM)
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
  • NYLON
  • HDPE

Coefficient of Friction

The coefficient of friction, or COF, is described as the ratio of the force of friction between two bodies and the force pressing them together. A lower friction coefficient indicates that the surfaces are slicker - there is less resistance to the sliding motion.

  • ABS
  • PC
  • PP
  • ACETAL(POM)
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
  • NYLON
  • HDPE

Heat Deflection Temp - 1.8MPa (℃)

The Heat deflection temperature (HDT) is the temperature at which a polymer or plastic sample deforms under a specified load. A constant load is applied in the centre of the specimen and the bath temperature is raised at a constant rate. The temperature of the bath at which the flexural deflection of the loading point has reached a predefined level is the heat deflection temperature of the material.

  • ABS
  • PC
  • PP
  • ACETAL(POM)
  • ACRYLIC(PMMA)
  • NYLON
  • HDPE

Please use above information as guidelines only

The information contained herein are guidelines, purely intended for Rapid Prototyping reference purpose only. We would not recommend using this information for Product Designing or Engineering decision-making purpose as many assumptions made while generating these graphs. Users should contact specific material manufactures for detailed information.